Summerfun

Between EvanstonMade and preparing for the pop up and gearing up for August’s events, my art life has been quite busy.

Nonetheless, I do make sure to stop and smell the flowers, observe butterflies, and stroll in nature.

I blog outdoors when I can to soak up the sun.

Here are some of the snapshots of my downtime in the past few months.

The grocery store’s passion flowers are a special memento of the person who first introduced me to this flower.

I stroll around the neighborhood and love looking at the indoor and outdoor bunnies.

The new Taco Place is plotting its grand opening.

I noticed this lovely little lending library that is twinning on the big house it belongs to.

I danced in the Custer Fair’s flashmob in June.

Then I cheered on my Hip Circle friends during their World Arts and Culture Fair performance.

The Collage Cafe continues to host workshops in the new space, and our last Grown*UP Girls project was weaving paper strips that we shared amongst each other after painting them.

I spotted a yellow butterfly on the way home recently.

Someone in the neighborhood has a Clueless license plate.

I splurged on an empowering movie on a half price Tuesday.

Angel frolicked in the Merrick Rose Garden last weekend.

When I am weary of the walking and doing, I spend reading on the sofa. Angel’s geneaology is fascinating.

It is a thrill to see monarchs take advantage of all the milkweed patches both the city and Evanston gardeners have planted.

They are not as abundant as a few summers ago, but spotting butterflies of any kind gives me hope that we aren’t killing them off just yet.

I hope we can reverse the damage humanity has done to nature.

I continue to monitor my outdoor dragonfly, and I think it is safe to keep my stakes in the garden.

Meanwhile, there are still a few other things I want to do.

  1. Walk the Openlands Long trail (I found the short trailhead but couldn’t tell where the long path merged, so I will be using the southern entrance next time)
  2. Watch Despicable Me 3 on a half-price Tuesday
  3. Find trailmaps for Harms Woods so I can return there again
  4. A cabin retreat to write (2 night stay-the pop up opening had me postpone my July 19 trip)
  5. View Takashi Murakami at MSA (I have until September 24)

What’s on your summer bucket list?

Evanston’s new Pop-up Gallery

On Thursday, a new pop-up shop will be opening its doors to the public. The Evanston Pop-up Gallery officially launches at 11 AM to showcase the art work of 50+ artists.

I snapped a photo of the application email when I walked by in June, and was promptly invited to see the space when I applied.

Having been a visitor to the former rendition of this storefront, I liked owner Steve and Sally’s vision for the space, and started scoping out the various options for my own display. 

After a few calls back and forth, we agreed to a pair of shelves by a mirror and I scoped out the dimensions some more.

It is always exciting to see something new take space. 

Maybe that’s why decorating shows are so popular, because we see spaces transform into something new.

I sat down at my bench and made some new earrings for summer.

Then I picked out the pieces I wanted to bring in and made the inventory sheet for it. The sheet was sent off so Sally would have time to add the inventory to the system.

After peeking in to see how lusciously other displays were coming together on Saturday, I decided to visit Michael’s and HomeGoods to scope out new shelf decorations.

HomeGoods inspired the look, and found the right pieces to complement each other.

I did some staging at home to ensure the dimensions would work.

On Monday I returned to Sherman Avenue. Steve put up my rented shelves and I started putting my display together.

Then the barcode stickers were printed and I cut them to size to fit my tags for the next 2 hours.

Then I heard a familiar voice, and Margarita and her mom popped in to plan out their space for Golden Sapphire bath bombs, soaps and other delicious materials to keep people and pets clean. Their natural and handcrafted bath and skincare products are safe for the environment, children, pets, and the rest of your family. All materials are recycled, and they use natural ingredients. I looove the bath bombs.

We are also partners at Hip Circle Empowerment Center’s Women-Powered Retail Zone so it will be fun to collaborate on this space as well. We decided to have fun in the selfie booth.

Angel also christened the selfie booth, and then Steve jumped in on the fun.

I also learned that Elektra and her husband will bring in their lampwork glass. Everlasting Fire Studio will bring in their beautiful  wine glasses, marbles and paperweights, and some pendants. I use their vases for my trunk shows.

The shelves were soon arranged, and I really like the look. It’s fun to see how a vision comes together in actuality.

I am super excited to see how the rest of the spaces come together.

There is already a lot of great art to see.

The pop-up gallery opens 11 am to 7 pm on Thursday at 1627 Sherman Avenue Evanston.

Then on Monday, the Mayor and Alderman will be present for a 4 pm ribbon cutting.

Check Facebook for updates, special events and hours

Here’s to a successful new boutique!

#SayHerName: The Women of the Witness Quilt

“We are all connected.
If we are not really invested in helping each other, there is no hope for us.
It’s about how our lives are all limited
without having deep conversations and interactions with one another.”
~ Melissa Blount

Women starting new lives in a new home or trying to get away from abuse. Young sisters killed by arson. Stray bullets hitting innocents at a wake. A baby left in the care of the wrong person. A woman walking her child in a park. The daughter of a police officer. The cousin of a basketball star. An accidental shooting.

Families are devastated because these women and children were in the line of fire, many through no provocation of their own.

The local news outlets have homicide trackers and timelines of how many people are killed on any given day in Chicago. It gets shrugged off as people being in the wrong place at the wrong time, that presumably they were walking around late at night, that somehow this was provoked. 

But in reviewing these stories, placing blame on the victim is utterly inappropriate. Melissa Blount, instigator of the Black Lives Matter Witness Quilt, gave me a list of the women on the quilt, with five more added since the quilt was completed. 

4 babies (some of whom lost their mothers in utero); 12 girls age 19 and under; 20 age 25 and under; 7 in their late 20s; 12 in their 30s; 3 in their 40s; 3 between 52 and 54 years old. These women and girls should be living out their lives. They are not statistics. They are human beings who loved, who lived, who danced, who had aspirations. Say their names. Click on the links and look at their faces.

  1. Sakinah Reed, 17, shot while standing on a corner
  2. Latania Anderson, 25, attempted peacemaking
  3. Tiana Brown, 20 , accidental shooting
  4. Shari Graham, 30, was sitting in a cab
  5. Daysha Wright, 21, was riding in a car
  6. Dejenaba A. Altman, 43, standing near an Elementary School  
  7. Babette Miller, 35, had just filed an abuse report
  8. Tiara M. Parks, 23, was getting out of a car 
  9. Kiara Kinard, 26, killed at home
  10. Makeesha Starks, 26, killed at home
  11. De’Kayla Dansberry, 16, stabbed 
  12. Camille C. Cooley, 36, murdered 
  13. Yvonne Nelson, 49, errant gunfire near Starbucks 
  14. Pamela Johnson, 32, struck by car while fleeing a robbery 
  15. Jessica Hampton, 25, stabbed on CTA red line 
  16. Chanda Foreman, 37, killed on her birthday 
  17. Shameka Heard 33, stabbed
  18. Katana (Greenlee) Hornbuckle, 2 months, child abuse by babysitter
  19. Africa Bass, 23, shot in front of her new home 
  20. Jessica Williams, 16, asthma attack after witnessing fatal shootings 
  21. Kayana Q. Armond, 33, shot at a memorial party 
  22. Madison Watson, 4, killed in arson fire of multi-unit building
  23. Melanie Watson, 3 months,killed in arson fire of multi-unit building
  24. Shaniyah Staples, 7, killed in arson fire of multi-unit building
  25. Tykina Ali, 20, killed while riding in a car 
  26. Nykea Aldridge,  32, killed while pushing her baby in a stroller 
  27. Othijah (Otha) M. Mooney, 35, killed at home 
  28. KeeKee Fleming 18, killed while attending a vigil 
  29. T.T. Saffore, 28, murdered
  30. Parasha M. Beard, 19, 8-months pregnant was sitting in a parked car 
  31. Adrianna Mayes, 21, killed in errant crossfire while holding her baby  
  32. Julia Martin, 28, stabbed after returning engagement ring 
  33. Marilyn Duffie 21, shot by roommate 
  34. Chiquita Ford, 30, shot while sitting in a car
  35. Emoni House, 20, killed at home with her brother 
  36. Cynthia Richardson, 54, shot on her front lawn 
  37. Nateyah Yahah Hines, 19, killed in attempted robbery 
  38. Shacora Jackson, 40, killed in attempted robbery (Nateyah’s mom)
  39. Sylvia Brice, 52, stabbed after attempting to move out on New Year’s Eve

2017

  1. Precious Land, 27, died after being paralyzed from a gunshot would 7 months prior 
  2. Jamayah Fields, 20, shot near an elementary school 
  3. Takiya Holmes 11, hit by stray bullet while running errands with family 
  4. Tenisha Mallet, 21, shot while in a group
  5. Kanari Gentry Bowers 12, shot while playing basketball at a school
  6. Tiara Richmond (KeKe Collier), 24, murdered 
  7. Wilteeah Jones, 20, shot in a parked car
  8. A’Miracle Jones, 5 months, Parasha M Beard’s baby died of prematurity 
  9. Janylah Mack, 4 months, born prematurely after her mom was abused
  10. Diamond Turner, 21, strangled 
  11. Tanisha Jackson, 30, shot during an argument 
  12. Patrice Calvin, 26, shot at home
  13. Dominque Victoria Scott, 23, shot while riding in a van
  14. Jacquetta Pearson, 22, shot while sitting in car
  15. Brittany Leflore, 22, killed while on her way home
  16. Tatyanna Lewis, 18, rammed into by a car 
  17. Naisha Weems, 27, struck by a car 
  18. Tashika Manuel-Dunbar, 35, shot while walking to her car
  19. Tina Brown, 53, shot in her home 
  20. Chastity Johnson, 18, shot while walking 
  21. Tiara Goodman, 25, murder-suicide
  22. Shantae Nevith, 22, shot 

I used the Sun Times link most often since this one systematically has photos of each victim. A google search will tell you more about each individual. These are our sisters.

Per Wikipedia: “#SayHerName is a social movement that seeks to raise awareness for black female victims of police brutality and anti-Black violence in the United States. #SayHerName aims to change the public perception that victims of police brutality and anti-Black violence are predominantly male by highlighting the gender-specific ways in which black women, particularly black queer women and black transgender women, are disproportionately affected by fatal acts of racial injustice. In an effort to create a large social media presence alongside existing racial justice campaigns, such as #BlackLivesMatter and #BlackGirlsMatter, the African American Policy Forum (AAPF) coined the hashtag #SayHerName in February 2015.

Black Lives Matter Witness Quilt

“I see this quilt as an opportunity to create repair.
When you have empathy, it is hard to do damage.
We haven’t dealt with the idea of how we have dehumanized black folk.”
~ Melissa Blount

On June 25, Evanston residents gathered for the unveiling of the Black Lives Matter Witness Quilt at the Frances Willard House Museum. The Black Lives Matter Witness Quilt was created by Melissa Blount, Making Evanston Equitable Together (MEET) and community volunteers, to honor and draw attention to the lives of Black women and girls lost to violence in Chicago by incorporating their names into a community quilt.

Community Sewing Circles of all levels gathered over the last several months to create this unique and beautiful quilt. 50 participants received the names of 56 women killed in 2016 through May 2017 and hand-stitched quilt blocks based on the biographies of each person.

Then the Blounts collected all the squares and sewed them into proper quilt blocks. The colors blue, white and red reflect the Chicago flag. Evanston Stitchworks had provided advice on the pattern, and then print artist Ben Blount assisted with the pops of red within the quilt. One person focused on making the stars, which are purposely sewn on incorrectly to show that Chicago is ‘upside down’, said Melissa.

The final quilt was revealed at the Frances Willard Home. “It turned out amazing, much more than I ever thought,” Melissa Blount

The quilt came out of Ben Blount’s exhibit in February at 1100 Florence. Around Martin Luther King Day a colleague stated that if there was a day off for every black man killed, no work would be done. Ben took this comment to heart, and started researching the number of men killed in 2016. In Chicago alone, this made for 275 Holidays in 2016, which he documented as a calendar.

While he was focusing on the men, he felt he was dismissing the lives of the black women. So his wife Melissa Blount took up the torch to research the homicides of women. Using the DNAInfo Chicago Murder timeline, she collected the names and stories of 56 women and girls.

Inspired by Seneca artist Marie Watt and the quilters of Gee’s Bend, Melissa chose to create a quilt (which she had never done before). She started hosting social justice social circles. Using pink floss, the attendees set about sewing their squares after they were given names and stories of their individual. One mother brought her young son, who worked on the quilt block of an infant. The youngest name is of a 2-month old baby.

One baby on the quilt was born prematurely after her mother was shot, and died later. Another baby died after a woman in her 8th month of pregnancy was beaten. Three sisters are also memorialized on the quilt, who were killed in an aunt’s multi-unit house fire set by arson. One name is the daughter of a Chicago Police officer another the cousin of a basketball athlete.

When Frances Willard House curator Lori Osborne heard of the event, she offered the museum up as a venue to unveil the quilt. The Frances Willard House served as headquarters for the Women’s Christian Temperance Union, an initiative to defend women’s rights by curbing domestic violence which was linked to men’s alcohol abuse.

“It was this blending of the past and the present in such a special way that made this venue so appropriate,” said Lori.

The women’s temperance movement used quilts as an expression to add their voices to political statements, Lori explained. A Victorian quilt was on display that held signatures of women from Illinois, Iowa and Colorado.

“It [quilting] was giving them back a voice in the power they lost,” said Lori. A petition at the Frances Willard House was sewn together after individual signatures were collected in various parts of the US.

Melissa pointed out that Frances Willard is criticized for not helping Ida B. Wells with the anti-lynching movement. Ida had asked Frances to participate, and she was originally on board. However, when she approached southern women about the initiative, she was told that these men were ‘rightfully’ being lynched, and that Frances would not be given funding for her initiatives if she became part of the anti-lynching campaign. So Frances backed off.

“Frances was about helping women deal with domestic violence and substance abuse,” said Melissa. “Frances was a badass for her time. She raised the marriageable age for women, she worked on prison reform, she wanted to empower women with Gladys (her bicycle) and movement.”

“The history of America is so complicated and nuanced. I don’t want to erase her contribution because she was a woman of her time,” Melissa said.

Nonetheless, today we should be bolder, especially in Evanston. Quoting a conversation with a younger woman, Melissa said: “If your feminism is not intersectional, it is not feminism.”

Melissa’s aim is to act as allies and collaborators in the idea of peace building and creating a beloved community. She believes Evanstonians can serve as an example to the rest of the country. Niles North School was involved in the project as well after one staff member participated in an early sewing circle.

“What we have here in Evanston can be solved if we are really intentional about doing this work”, said Melissa. “There is a cognitive dissonance between what we think Evanston is [in terms of diversity and equity] than what it actually is.”

How does this quilt relate to Black Lives Matter? Melissa had an answer to that: Black Lives Matter has become equivalent to police brutality in the news. However, this brutality is as a result of the trauma of white supremacy. The underfunding of schools and resources in certain communities is an intentional state sanctioned act of discrimination, which creates space for violence, Melissa said: “Violence happens when you are proximate. “

The quilt encouraged the conversation about the issue of racism and oppression, and humanizes the lives of babies and women. The stitchers were asked to hold these women in their hearts as they sewed.

“We are all connected,” Melissa said. “If we are not really invested in helping each other, there is no hope for us. It’s about how our lives are all limited without having deep conversations and interactions with one another.”

MEET wants to continue gathering the community to engage in social justice handwork activities. Melissa and MEET plan to create a second quilt based on the lives lost from June 2017, because they know there will be more deaths.

Another quilt in the shape of the American Flag will focus on national violence against women, also with an eye on mental health issues based on the recent death of Charleena Lyles.

 

Lastly, the misgendering of two people in the media gave rise to the idea of researching transgender violence and creating a quilt for those losses.

The quilt traveled to the Evanston Art Center for public viewing and an additional talk at the end of June. This quilt is intended to travel, and initiatives are underway to move the quilt to other places. The names and stories of these women will also be bound into a book. “The stories of their deaths are so varied,” said Melissa. “It’s just been a transformative experience.”

As part of the local Black Lives Matters Movement, the Blounts are selling their remaining 281 Black Lives Matter yard signs for $10 each (via email) to raise funds for Moms United Against Violence and Incarceration.  The funds will go toward chartering buses that will take the children of incarcerated mothers to their prisons for visitation, a 4-hour ride for many. Selling out of these signs will ensure funding for these buses until the end of the year. BLM Shirts are available at www.blountobjects.com.

“When you incarcerate a mother, you are creating a ripple effect,” said Melissa. With 80% of incarcerated mothers having children under age 18, these children will experience incarceration themselves. Foster care has a criminalization effect on these children. “Segregation hurts us all and limits us all,” she said.

When a listener at the Evanston Art Center discussion expressed a sense of powerlessness at the current state of the world, Melissa quoted Bryan Stevenson in addressing our problems:
1. Get proximate
2. Change the narrative
3. Protect your hopefulness
4. Get comfortable with being uncomfortable

“Officers are not lying when this say they feel threatened. The narrative of who black people are, that’s what we need to change,” she said.

While Melissa is lauded for the quilt effort, she is aware many other movements preceded the quilt. “There are people who have been in the trenches long before me,” she said, citing Chicago Freedom School, Black Youth Project and other names I didn’t catch.

In keeping with #SayHerName, here are the names on the quilt, by age:
Babies under 1 year old: Katana (Greenlee) Hornbuckle, Melanie Watson, Janylah Mack, A’Miracle Jones
Children under 10: Madison Watson, Shaniyah Staples
Tweens and Teens: Takiya Holmes, Kanari Gentry Bowers, Jessica Williams, De’Kayla Dansberry, Sakinah Reed, KeeKee Fleming, Tatyanna Lewis, Nateyah Yahah Hines, Parasha M. Beard
Women in their 20s: Tykina Ali, Jamayah Fields, Wilteeah Jones, Tiana Brown, Emoni House, Tenisha Mallet, Adrianna Mayes, Daysha Wright, Marilyn Duffie, Diamond Turner, Jacquetta Pearson, Brittany Leflore, Dominque Victoria Scott, Tiara M. Parks, Africa Bass, Tiara Richmond (KeKe Collier), Jessica Hampton, Latania Anderson, Makeesha Starks, Patrice Calvin, Kiara Kinard, Precious Land, Naisha Weems, T.T. Saffore, Julia Martin
Women in their 30s: Tanisha Jackson, Shari Graham, Chiquita Ford, Pamela Johnson, Nykea Aldridge, Shameka Heard, Kayana Q. Armond, Othijah (Otha) M. Mooney, Babette Miller, Camille C. Cooley, Chanda Foreman
Women in their 40s: Shacora Jackson, Dejenaba A. Altman, Yvonne Nelson
Women in their 50s: Sylvia Brice, Cynthia Richardson

Dressmaking part 2

Earlier this year I took a dressmaking class at the lovely Evanston Stitchworks.

Then when my mom came to visit, instead of heading to the Mall we picked out my new future wardrobe based on the gorgeous fabrics owner Amalia curates at Stitchworks. It was good to get a second opinion on some of the fabrics I had been eyeing.

My first mission was to re-make the dress I had learned to do in class. What I learned is that I had some serious beginners luck with the blue version.

I prepped the new fabric and impatiently waited for it to dry.

Because this fabric has birds flying in a specific direction, I already needed help in the cutting stage, not sure how to account for the direction of the fabric based on the layout in the booklet. I swung by Stitchworks with photos, and I was directed along the right path.

I also cut up the other pattern, so I checked the interfacing template against the old dress just in case.

Then, I realized that it had been a long time since the workshop, and I forgot the steps to many sewing parts. So I consulted notes and a sewing manual to jog my memory.

I pinned everything together and started following instructions.

Soon the shoulders, sides and skirt were joined. I tried it on to make sure the darts were in the right place.

Then I realized that Amalia had helped me along on the dress-fold in a different way than the pattern instructions. The instructions called for sewing the dress sides before the skirt fold.

With French Seams, this made for some bunching on the sides. It had already taken me 3 tries to get the side seams right.

In my bonus session, we had actually sewn the top and skirt together first and then closed the side seams, but I had been too engrossed in following the written pattern instructions this time around.

I didn’t want to rip up the sides of the dress (again!), so, I soldiered on with ripping, re-stitching, and ripping again for the pleat. After a few adjustments, I made peace with attempt 3.

Replicating the perfect collar seams was a challenge too. While there are a plethora of Youtube tutorials out there, finding the one resembling what I learned was a challenge, so I did what I could.

I know the flaws the armholes have, but hopefully the fabric will detract from all the (re)stitching. Then, in the final stretch, it turns out my neckline was larger than the bias I had cut out.

Oh seamripper, here you are again…

Thankfully I had purchased bias tape for a future project that matched the current fabric, so with the help of YouTube tutorials I was able to finish the dress in time for the Evanston Made Sip and Shop. I took pictures for visual reference next time.

I actually like the accent, so this mishap was a blessing in disguise.

It was fun to meet friends and hang out with local art for the final night of the exhibit.

Amalia was happy to see the dress finished in time as well, and rocking her latest creation.

I am happy with how it all turned out, and looking at both dresses cheers me up. I may shorten one of the hemlines, but haven’t decided on that yet.

Next up is a more complicated project, for which Amalia warned me to start with a sheet to get the sizing worked out. I’ll be planning some tutorial trips over to Stitchworks for that one. I am looking forward to having a studio dress in addition to then trying on a bolder fabric for outside wearing.

The Fall workshop line-up is in the works now, so check back on the Evanston Stitchworks page for new patterns and techniques to be taught. Meanwhile, I have many fabulous fat quarters awaiting conversion into pendants.

It’s fun to play with how the wax interacts with cotton and the different effect that has with the wire.

These are bigger pendants than my usual preference, but I know they will find homes.

One dragonfly stake with my blue dress fabric is undergoing garden testing in Germany right now. My own outdoors dragonfly is still doing well after a few storms and heat waves.

 

A family angel collaboration

Recently a friend asked me about various angel options, and when she mentioned having her children draw something, I couldn’t wait to start on this project.

I gave my friend my angel paper to use (handmade scraps and teabags), and the family sat down to decorate.

I received two drawings for the body, and two quotes for wings.

The young girl who drew the family had a preference over which picture to use, so that gave me the dimensions of my angel.

This body would be much bigger than my jig setup, but I started with the template anyway.

Then I resized the circle to fit the size of the family picture.

I also fit the wings around the quotes I had been given, and soon a wire angel emerged. Because the young girl had drawn a heart, I knew that would be the angel bodice embellishment.

Then I waxed the paper in encaustic medium on my skillet.

Safety is key, and I always wear my mask when the encaustic is hot.

I couldn’t let the extra art go to waste, so I made a bonus pendant as well.

Because the mom loves purple, I added a dash of purple encaustic paint to the wire.

I fit the wings so the quotes would be legible.

Dashes of color.

Then I fused the paper to the wings, the body, and added a head.

Exacto knives are my friends in the trimming process.

It is always fun to see the translucent effect the wax adds to the paper.

I hope the Su family enjoys these two mementos marking a transition in their lives. This is a fun way to memorialize chapters in family life, and I could see this as a family ornament tradition.

Let me know if you need a custom piece that incorporates a quote, a drawing, or vintage heirlooms wrapped in wire. I am always happy to collaborate on special pieces to reflect the owner of a handmade creation.

Hand pampering and company gift creating

Sometimes weary hands need a bit of pampering, and it had been far too long since I visited Noktivo.

On Friday I gave my hands and feet a break and settled into one of the comfy chairs at Lena Rose. The hands deserved a break, since Noktivo and Lena Rose owner Jenny had asked me to make keychains for her employees.

She had eyed my sparkle bead keychain at a pop-up, and asked if I could make some as gifts. Inspired by her decor, I went through my button stash and made rose keychains, which were immediately approved.

I gathered more roses and started bending rose-colored wire to add to the steel.

The softness of this handmade paper rose contrasts with the industrial steel, and gives it a safe haven.

I also made a double-rose keychain.

It is on Jenny to pick who receives which keychain.

My nails kept up with the visual theme, and after getting the lengths evened out and a lovely massage I was lacquered with a cheerful non-toxic pink.

I also delivered some bangles for consignment, so you can adorn your pampered wrists with one of those on your next visit to Lena Rose.

Keeping with the rose theme, I delivered some pink bangles as well.

I still have more sparklies from my Bead & Button Show excursion, which are available for custom sizing.

One rose had too little wire for a bangle, so it became a pendant instead.

Lena Rose offers a variety of natural beauty products that are free of toxins to keep you healthy and preserve the environment. I love the spray-on sunscreen for its lightweight application and strong protection.

After my hands and feet were thoroughly relaxed, I strolled next door to see what First Slice Pie had to offer. This lovely cafe and bakery has sweet and savory treats. My favorite summer pie was available, and I took a mini strawberry-rhubarb pie home.

Now my nails are ready for the Independence Day festivities.

Lena Rose Natural Beauty is located at 4668 N. Manor Avenue in Chicago. You can book appointments via this link.

Final Evanston Made Sip ‘n Shop

June has flown by, and this is the final week to see all the Evanston Made art on display at the Evanston Art Center. As of July 1, all this lovely art will be off to new owners or back to artists’ studios. To celebrate the success of this annual event, Evanston Made is hosting a Sip ’n Shop party on Thursday, June 29 from 5 pm to 8 pm.

Enjoy a night of cocktails, nibbles and shopping at the Evanston Made Pop Up Shop at the Evanston Art Center, located at 1717 Central Street. It’s your last night to purchase locally created goods by the creatives of Evanston.

You can peruse ceramics that are decorative and functional, fiber arts you can wear, carry with you, or hang on the wall. Handmade Jewelry is abundant and offers something for everyone.

Gorgeous leather goods include bags and keychains. Prints, postcards, stickers and books offer affordable art that makes a statement. I especially love the mixed media vignettes.

You can also take in the full exhibit on the main floor one more time. I love all the vibrant art that showcases the variety of artisan skills Evanstonians have.

The event is free and open to the public. Though we hope you invest in some of your local artists, of course…

The night before, Wednesday, June 28 I will finally make my way to the Five and Dime for the Evanston Made Closing party. Dan Kelch of Lulu’s, Five & Dime and Taco Diablo is throwing a party to say “Thank you” to everyone who participated in Evanston Made!

There will be food and drink from 6 pm to 9 pm at 1026 Davis Street in Evanston. We’ll celebrate the volunteers who made this event happen.

I’ve never been to the Five & Dime but have great things about it, so I am looking forward to this excursion in my home town. If you cannot make it to either, be sure to follow the artists below for upcoming events. Their art is so lovely and I have been honored to be in such good company this month.

 

 

Sacred Art Trunk Show

Summer is here, and with it come leisurely strolls around neighborhoods to peruse art and beauty.  On June 10 I visited the bustling Lincoln Square Neighborhood for a Meet & Greet at Sacred Art.

I set up my wares in a lovely nook, and met wonderful customers.

Sacred Art hosts handmade creations by more than 100 artists. There are numerous gift items to cheer up friends, adorn your home and or a human with, or to use in your every day life.

Chicago lovers have a plethora of unique gifts to choose from as an alternative to mass-manufactured tourist tchotchkes.

The store is also a wonderful inspiration for decoration ideas.

I had a lovely afternoon absorbing the Lincoln Square vibe and seeing pieces adopted.


Sacred Art is located at 4619 N Lincoln Avenue in Chicago and still has a selection of my pendants and pant stakes available.

Check out upcoming Sacred Art events on their Facebook page.


Evanston Made 2017 Tour

For 4 years in a row, Evanston Made has been held the first weekend of June.


Evanston-based artists open their private studios for one day only, so the public can see where they create. In addition, local businesses partner with artists to display their work all month long (if not on a more long-term basis, like Stumble & Relish).


The Evanston Art Center also hosts a pop-up shop, designed by Anomaly Productions, which features functional art by local artists, including me.


I have some of my swarm and angels in the shop this month, and helped with setting up other merchandise on June 1.


It was fun to peruse the other beautiful creations in the store, and help place them in the display Amy Amoroso had set up.


The art work includes assemblage vignettes, prints, booklets, keychains, leather bags, fiber fashion for kids and adults, ceramics, home decor, spark syrup, greeting cards, and jewelry.


My swarm had a whole new arrangement I would not have thought up myself.


On June 2, we had the Evanston Made opening party, and customers began perusing the store.


The Art Center’s Evanston Made Exhibit features numerous Evanston Artists with one piece each.


The art work is very vibrant this year.


Spark Syrup offered samplings in addition to the bar and nibbles.


3-D art is also welcomed.


Numerous people showed up to peruse the art work and support their artist friends.


Pantsuit Nation by Melanie Deal, which has a red dot, is one of my favorite pieces in the show.


Ben Blount’s framed print is already claimed, but you can pick up unframed prints in the pop-up shop.


Jason Brown had created location-specific installation art for the exhibit.


My Daisy Dots Constellation is on view as well.


I enjoyed the fabulous response on opening night, and loved watching people peruse all the items in the store.


Artists attend the pop-up on a rotating basis during Evanston Art Center’s Business Hours until June 30.


Meanwhile, the exhibit gave a sneak peek at the types of art to be featured during the Saturday Artist Tour.


One Dragonfly fluttered off to be gifted.


Spearheaded by Lisa Degliatoni, participating venues are plotted on a map by IDG, so Evanston residents can stroll their neighborhoods and get to know their creative neighbors.


I visited my friends Lauren and Rory Coyne first. With Rory’s venture into Coyne leather, the layout of their home studio had changed quite a bit.


Then I visited Ben Blount, who helped people create prints onsite.


A staged home became an artist coop showcase, with the dining room featuring Ellen Greene.


FUSEDChicago member Katsy Johnson was also represented.


Because of the tight schedule, I drove to the various clusters of artist studios. On Sherman, Platform had a wonderful new installation.


Then I visited Jason Brown and Yadi in a garage near her living quarters.


Then I needed lunch, which I got at Curt’s Cafe, which also has rotating exhibit, and is helping young ladies learn skills in the food industry to get their careers going.


Lea Pinsky and Dustin Harris showcased the murals they create in Chicagoland. Their work is on Church Street in Evanston, and they are assisting the Main-Dempster Mile in more beautification.


Then I headed over to Florence to peruse the vibrant artists street there, and discovered the Rembrandt Chamber Musicians, where singer Josefien Stoppelenburg had her music-themed paintings.


Ausrine’s Art Room is full of beauty.


I love doll houses so much, and Mill Creek Miniatures keeps making new ones.


I ended at 1100 Florence to observe the wonderful Nasty Women Fundraiser frenzy that evening.


You can peruse additional Evanston Made photos on my Facebook page. The Pop-up shop and the exhibit at Evanston Art Center are up through June 30.


Keep on supporting local art!