Evanston’s Terrain Biennial

On a recent summery Sunday I did an art scavenger hunt in Evanston. As part of the 3rd Terrain Biennial, Evanston artists have organized eight host locations on a walkable route, along Wesley and Florence between Emerson and Dempster. Eight homes are hosting the work of nine artists on the front yard, porch, or facade. Participating artists include Ben Blount, Paul Catanese, Shawn Decker, Alice George, Patrick Lichty, Kristin Mariani, Niki Nolin, Laurie O’Brien, Mat Rappaport, Anne Hayden Stevens and Kevin Valentine.

I started with The Beloved Community by Ben Blount. His collaboration with 40 artists resulted in a miniature community with a small Black Lives Matter yard sign to demonstrate neighborhood unity.

Next to this tiny neighborhood, nine full-sized Black Lives Matter yard signs, one for each of Evanston’s wards, were altered/defaced to reflect the recent vandalism and theft of Black Lives Matter signs in Evanston neighborhoods.

Near Ben’s installation was Laurie O’Brien‘s Dislocation, a birdhouse installation that held a miniature cinema. I felt like I would be trespassing to check out the piece closer, so I didn’t see the miniature film that is held inside.

On a sign was a poem by Niki Nolin, who also has a video installation in the exhibit.

I drove to the next location, Shawn Decker’s The Night Sounds. www.shawndecker.comThere was a definite hum coming from the bucket installation suspended between two trees as Cicadas were singing on a warm afternoon. A small motor activates this sculpture that is also going to change sound as rain falls into the buckets.

Next for me was 24 Hour Psycho (With Apologies to Douglas Gordon) by Patrick Lichty and Mat Rappaport. I heard an eerie soundtrack but wasn’t sure where to look for the actual video loop associated with this installation. A few signs were already written on, and I added my message (not pictured). I look forward to returning to this one to see how it evolves.

Another installation to return to is Kristin Mariani’Off Shoot. She will continue to weave this photoluminescent thread for the duration of the exhibit.

On Lake street, I visited Kevin Valentine‘s The Structure of Memory. His structure of woven together branches is dedicated to the widows of Iraq. “The created space is for contemplation, remembering sacrifices made, representing the complexity and hollowness of life after conflict, but also for hope, rebuilding and peace. These found sticks and driftwood were used by participants in drawing symbolic lines in the sand in memory of and solidarity with the millions of uncounted widows from decades of strife in the Middle East.  Each branch is dated and signed by participants who marked half-a-million lines in the beaches of Chicago, Evanston and elsewhere over several years.”

Next I walked over to Paul Catanese‘s Aerial Reference Studies, using reference markers used in aerial cartography. It would be cool to view this one from up high.

My last stop was Anne Stevens‘ Sleeping Giants, representing the mountains that resemble humans. “We are the sleeping giants now, moving at a glacial pace as our country twists and turns on a new axis. Our local lives continue—work, school, eat, sleep—but we struggle with erosion of policies that protect our democratic society.”

Founded in October of 2011 by artist Sabina Ott and author John Paulett, Terrain Exhibitions and The Terrain Biennial repurposes private spaces such as front yards, porches, or windows, turning them into public spaces in order to foster dialogue between neighbors and provide opportunities for artists and viewers alike to experience new perspectives.

Along the way nature inserted its own art. It is fun to become more observant in neighborhoods and see art that isn’t labeled as such, but can be enjoyed nonetheless.

There was also a fun whimsical garden installation that gave me a chuckle.

This year, 115 sites and more than 115 artists are participating in the Terrain Biennial. Projects include sites across Chicagoland, Springfield, Iowa City, Los Angeles, Tucson, and Marnay-sur-Seine, France.  For more information on The Terrain Biennial, including the 2017 partnership with Chicago’s Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events (DCASE) visit the FAQ page here. Learn more about Chicago’s “Year of Public Art” here.

The 3rd Terrain Biennial runs through November 15, 2017 between Emerson and Dempster Streets.
Grab the interactive map here.

Dressmaking part 2

Earlier this year I took a dressmaking class at the lovely Evanston Stitchworks.

Then when my mom came to visit, instead of heading to the Mall we picked out my new future wardrobe based on the gorgeous fabrics owner Amalia curates at Stitchworks. It was good to get a second opinion on some of the fabrics I had been eyeing.

My first mission was to re-make the dress I had learned to do in class. What I learned is that I had some serious beginners luck with the blue version.

I prepped the new fabric and impatiently waited for it to dry.

Because this fabric has birds flying in a specific direction, I already needed help in the cutting stage, not sure how to account for the direction of the fabric based on the layout in the booklet. I swung by Stitchworks with photos, and I was directed along the right path.

I also cut up the other pattern, so I checked the interfacing template against the old dress just in case.

Then, I realized that it had been a long time since the workshop, and I forgot the steps to many sewing parts. So I consulted notes and a sewing manual to jog my memory.

I pinned everything together and started following instructions.

Soon the shoulders, sides and skirt were joined. I tried it on to make sure the darts were in the right place.

Then I realized that Amalia had helped me along on the dress-fold in a different way than the pattern instructions. The instructions called for sewing the dress sides before the skirt fold.

With French Seams, this made for some bunching on the sides. It had already taken me 3 tries to get the side seams right.

In my bonus session, we had actually sewn the top and skirt together first and then closed the side seams, but I had been too engrossed in following the written pattern instructions this time around.

I didn’t want to rip up the sides of the dress (again!), so, I soldiered on with ripping, re-stitching, and ripping again for the pleat. After a few adjustments, I made peace with attempt 3.

Replicating the perfect collar seams was a challenge too. While there are a plethora of Youtube tutorials out there, finding the one resembling what I learned was a challenge, so I did what I could.

I know the flaws the armholes have, but hopefully the fabric will detract from all the (re)stitching. Then, in the final stretch, it turns out my neckline was larger than the bias I had cut out.

Oh seamripper, here you are again…

Thankfully I had purchased bias tape for a future project that matched the current fabric, so with the help of YouTube tutorials I was able to finish the dress in time for the Evanston Made Sip and Shop. I took pictures for visual reference next time.

I actually like the accent, so this mishap was a blessing in disguise.

It was fun to meet friends and hang out with local art for the final night of the exhibit.

Amalia was happy to see the dress finished in time as well, and rocking her latest creation.

I am happy with how it all turned out, and looking at both dresses cheers me up. I may shorten one of the hemlines, but haven’t decided on that yet.

Next up is a more complicated project, for which Amalia warned me to start with a sheet to get the sizing worked out. I’ll be planning some tutorial trips over to Stitchworks for that one. I am looking forward to having a studio dress in addition to then trying on a bolder fabric for outside wearing.

The Fall workshop line-up is in the works now, so check back on the Evanston Stitchworks page for new patterns and techniques to be taught. Meanwhile, I have many fabulous fat quarters awaiting conversion into pendants.

It’s fun to play with how the wax interacts with cotton and the different effect that has with the wire.

These are bigger pendants than my usual preference, but I know they will find homes.

One dragonfly stake with my blue dress fabric is undergoing garden testing in Germany right now. My own outdoors dragonfly is still doing well after a few storms and heat waves.

 

Final Evanston Made Sip ‘n Shop

June has flown by, and this is the final week to see all the Evanston Made art on display at the Evanston Art Center. As of July 1, all this lovely art will be off to new owners or back to artists’ studios. To celebrate the success of this annual event, Evanston Made is hosting a Sip ’n Shop party on Thursday, June 29 from 5 pm to 8 pm.

Enjoy a night of cocktails, nibbles and shopping at the Evanston Made Pop Up Shop at the Evanston Art Center, located at 1717 Central Street. It’s your last night to purchase locally created goods by the creatives of Evanston.

You can peruse ceramics that are decorative and functional, fiber arts you can wear, carry with you, or hang on the wall. Handmade Jewelry is abundant and offers something for everyone.

Gorgeous leather goods include bags and keychains. Prints, postcards, stickers and books offer affordable art that makes a statement. I especially love the mixed media vignettes.

You can also take in the full exhibit on the main floor one more time. I love all the vibrant art that showcases the variety of artisan skills Evanstonians have.

The event is free and open to the public. Though we hope you invest in some of your local artists, of course…

The night before, Wednesday, June 28 I will finally make my way to the Five and Dime for the Evanston Made Closing party. Dan Kelch of Lulu’s, Five & Dime and Taco Diablo is throwing a party to say “Thank you” to everyone who participated in Evanston Made!

There will be food and drink from 6 pm to 9 pm at 1026 Davis Street in Evanston. We’ll celebrate the volunteers who made this event happen.

I’ve never been to the Five & Dime but have great things about it, so I am looking forward to this excursion in my home town. If you cannot make it to either, be sure to follow the artists below for upcoming events. Their art is so lovely and I have been honored to be in such good company this month.

 

 

Evanston Made 2017 Tour

For 4 years in a row, Evanston Made has been held the first weekend of June.


Evanston-based artists open their private studios for one day only, so the public can see where they create. In addition, local businesses partner with artists to display their work all month long (if not on a more long-term basis, like Stumble & Relish).


The Evanston Art Center also hosts a pop-up shop, designed by Anomaly Productions, which features functional art by local artists, including me.


I have some of my swarm and angels in the shop this month, and helped with setting up other merchandise on June 1.


It was fun to peruse the other beautiful creations in the store, and help place them in the display Amy Amoroso had set up.


The art work includes assemblage vignettes, prints, booklets, keychains, leather bags, fiber fashion for kids and adults, ceramics, home decor, spark syrup, greeting cards, and jewelry.


My swarm had a whole new arrangement I would not have thought up myself.


On June 2, we had the Evanston Made opening party, and customers began perusing the store.


The Art Center’s Evanston Made Exhibit features numerous Evanston Artists with one piece each.


The art work is very vibrant this year.


Spark Syrup offered samplings in addition to the bar and nibbles.


3-D art is also welcomed.


Numerous people showed up to peruse the art work and support their artist friends.


Pantsuit Nation by Melanie Deal, which has a red dot, is one of my favorite pieces in the show.


Ben Blount’s framed print is already claimed, but you can pick up unframed prints in the pop-up shop.


Jason Brown had created location-specific installation art for the exhibit.


My Daisy Dots Constellation is on view as well.


I enjoyed the fabulous response on opening night, and loved watching people peruse all the items in the store.


Artists attend the pop-up on a rotating basis during Evanston Art Center’s Business Hours until June 30.


Meanwhile, the exhibit gave a sneak peek at the types of art to be featured during the Saturday Artist Tour.


One Dragonfly fluttered off to be gifted.


Spearheaded by Lisa Degliatoni, participating venues are plotted on a map by IDG, so Evanston residents can stroll their neighborhoods and get to know their creative neighbors.


I visited my friends Lauren and Rory Coyne first. With Rory’s venture into Coyne leather, the layout of their home studio had changed quite a bit.


Then I visited Ben Blount, who helped people create prints onsite.


A staged home became an artist coop showcase, with the dining room featuring Ellen Greene.


FUSEDChicago member Katsy Johnson was also represented.


Because of the tight schedule, I drove to the various clusters of artist studios. On Sherman, Platform had a wonderful new installation.


Then I visited Jason Brown and Yadi in a garage near her living quarters.


Then I needed lunch, which I got at Curt’s Cafe, which also has rotating exhibit, and is helping young ladies learn skills in the food industry to get their careers going.


Lea Pinsky and Dustin Harris showcased the murals they create in Chicagoland. Their work is on Church Street in Evanston, and they are assisting the Main-Dempster Mile in more beautification.


Then I headed over to Florence to peruse the vibrant artists street there, and discovered the Rembrandt Chamber Musicians, where singer Josefien Stoppelenburg had her music-themed paintings.


Ausrine’s Art Room is full of beauty.


I love doll houses so much, and Mill Creek Miniatures keeps making new ones.


I ended at 1100 Florence to observe the wonderful Nasty Women Fundraiser frenzy that evening.


You can peruse additional Evanston Made photos on my Facebook page. The Pop-up shop and the exhibit at Evanston Art Center are up through June 30.


Keep on supporting local art!

Creativity at Creative Coworking

My last pop-up in May was a set-up for Evanston Made Month at Creative Coworking.

The May-June Art & Wine Night featured macro photography art by Ross Martens and vibrant paintings by Laura Engel.

I set up a booth in a conference room, complemented by artwork created by Greg Palmer.

As usual, art appreciators came to converse about the work.

Laura showed off one of my favorite pendants, which she bought before the reception began. 🙂

Who doesn’t love rainbow druzy?

I chatted with wonderful Evanstonians throughout the evening.

It was fun to try out the new vases created by Everlasting Fire Studio just for me.

The Creative Coworking Art & Wine Nights always feature nibbles.

I liked the shadow games my pieces were playing.

It is always good to have extra product shots for the webshop (which is undergoing repair).

A few pieces found new homes.

And in time for pride month I was able to give Angela her rainbow safety pin commission.

It was a lovely evening, and I look forward to the next rotation of art in the front lobby.

My butterflies have moved to the third floor of Creative Coworking to make room for Virginia Kondziolka’s beautiful pieces downstairs.

This is my favorite Engel.

You can view this exhibit until the end of the month as part of Evanston Made.

People photos courtesy Creative Coworking

Nasty Women Raising Funds

Oh my goodness, the Nasty Women Exhibit was an amazing experience. Shortly after the Evanston Made Studio Walks ended, people started lining up at 1100 Florence to ensure they got first dibs on the art work.

112 women from Evanston and near the North Shore donated artwork to be sold at $100 a piece. All proceeds went to Planned Parenthood of Illinois.

We were able to peruse the walls during the Evanston Made Artwalk, but sales were not made until 6 pm sharp.

The art work submitted was vibrant, humorous, and rebellious.

I enjoyed seeing everyone’s overt, cheeky or subtle take on the Nasty Women theme.

While Donald Trump used the phrase “nasty woman” to belittle and disrespect Hillary Clinton in a presidential debate, millions around the world have used it as a powerful rallying cry against the current administration.

At 5:40 pm the line to the gallery was one block long.

Between 6 and 6:30, numerous red dots were distributed within minutes of the doors opening.

Those dots marked that a piece had been claimed.

Once the piece was officially purchased, it was taken off the wall and went home with the happy recipient.

The space was packed, but the system worked well.

The traffic flow continued until 7:15, after which the sales slowed down a little bit.

The art show raised more than $10,000 for Planned Parenthood.

I didn’t get to see my piece earn a red dot before I had to leave for another engagement, but what didn’t sell Saturday can be viewed by appointment at 1100 Florence for the next 30 days.

Some custom commemorative posters by Diana Sudyka are also available. A gallery of all the art work and the event will be available online at NastyWomenEvanston.


Nasty Women Evanston is inspired by the Nasty Women Exhibition in NYC and the growing number of sister shows all over the world supporting women’s causes.

Check out 1100 Florence for upcoming events and exhibits. They will definitely showcase more thought-provoking and fun art in the future.

Here’s a thank you from organizers Lisa Degliatoni and Kathy Halper:

“We’ve been screaming “THANK YOU!” since Saturday night. Can you hear us? You made this happen beyond our wildest hopes! We will be back in a few days with hard numbers but we know we exceeded our ‘dream goal’ of $10,000! And while we expected to sell a lot of art we did not expect to sell SO much!

We have a hand full of pieces left. There are still a few very nice works that somehow got overlooked in the frenzy. If you’d like to see them, Lisa will be showing them at 1100 Florence. 

THANK YOU to the Evanston community and all who attended for embracing the spirit of the night, as well as the beautiful weather, and being so patient and good natured and generous and loving. Nothing made us happier than seeing the party atmosphere outside while the crowds shopped inside!

You are all wonderful! Maybe we can accomplish anything.”

Evanston Made 2017

I love the Evanston Made initiative, and this year I’ll actually be part of the pop-up at the Evanston Art Center. Evanston Made is an annual celebration focusing on Evanston creatives. Throughout June, studios, galleries and businesses open their doors to showcase works (artistic, artisanal, etc.) by Evanston creatives.

The month-long event kicks off with an artist reception on Friday, June 2, from 6 to 9 p.m at the Evanston Art Center. The Art Center will host the exhibit Evanston Made, featuring works by Evanston creatives (including me) from June 2- through June 30.  The Art Center is located at 1717 Central Street in Evanston.

From 12 to 5 pm on Saturday, June 3, artists will host open studios to the public. Maps for the studio tour are available online and at Evanston Art Center. The list of artist studios is extensive.


The Art Center will also house the Evanston Made Pop Up Shop, at which I will have a few of my ornaments. The pop-up is coordinated by Amy Amoroso of AnoMaly Productions. The hours of the pop up shop are the same as the Evanston Art Center hours of operation, when the Art Center is open the Pop Up is open.

Evanston Made Kids! is June 17, 12-4 p.m., at Evanston Art Center, and celebrates young Evanston artists and their families with a day of free fun and creativity. This event also features a pop up shop of kid’s wares.

Throughout Evanston, participating businesses will also showcase works by Evanston Artists through June, turning the city of Evanston into an Art Gallery. It is a great month to discover the numerous pockets of artistic creativity in Evanston, and to get to know artists you didn’t know were your neighbors.

Maybe I’ll see you around town as we explore the various venues! Thank you to Lisa Degliatoni of 1100 Florence for being a driving force in organizing this event. Be sure to check out the sister event, Nasty Women Evanston, Saturday evening!

Evanston Made ArtWalk

Evanston Made is a month-long celebration of the arts in Evanston designed to create opportunities for artists to engage with the community (and vice versa).

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Art studios, galleries, museums and businesses throughout Evanston are showing works by Evanston creatives June 3 through 30.

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I put on my bangles for the Opening Soiree.

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Opening night was packed at the Evanston Art Center.

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I heard 300 artists were represented in the show.

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My piece had a lovely prime spot.

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The second floor holds four thoughtful exhibits, 2 by groups and two by solo artists.

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In conjunction with the exhibit, Evanston Art Center is hosting a Pop Up Gallery and Store June 3-30.

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The store is located in the lobby of the Evanston Art Center, 1717 Central Street, Evanston.

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You can meet the various artists during their pop-up shifts.

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It turns out one of the Brothers K baristas is an artist as well, and he did a demo at the Art Center on Opening night.

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His pillows are at the Pop-up, and you can see his art work at Brothers K Coffeehouse.

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I bumped into a few friends, one of whom snapped my photo.

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After the opening I plotted my route with the fabulous Evanston Made map.

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I started out on Florence Avenue which had changed quite a bit since my last visit there.

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Angel felt right at home at Mill Creek Miniatures.

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I wanted to get lost daydreaming about all the little vignettes.

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You can get doll houses restored or custom made here.

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The beauty of these studio tours is that you can see the tools of the trade, like Beth Adler’s.

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So much mesmerizing print work.

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Next door I could have gotten lost in Rita Shimelfarb’s stained glass portraits as well.

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I learned about a co-op called Space 900.

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I drove to the Dempster/Chicago area next, where inspirational Karna Designs was open.

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I swung by See Jane Sparkle.

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My pieces are enjoying various arrangements.

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Stumble & Relish hosts a variety of EvanstonMade products year-round

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Frame Warehouse had one of the Swarm posters up, and Paul Nebenzahl was doodling inside. A few shops have artists on display through June 30.

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After parking my car by Main Street, the rain started in earnest, but I wanted to see my friends anyway.

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At The Collage Cafe three artists are on display.

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I am looking forward to my next playtime, and enjoy seeing my pieces in such joyful and inspirational company.

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Evanston Sticthworks has beautiful quilts up by Ann Wasserman.

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She was there in person and we had a lovely conversation.

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Vanessa Filley’s dolls would fit right in at Evanston Stitchworts.

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I visited my friend at Oliver’s Toys where Angel had fun chatting up a knight in shining armor and petting a fluffy hedgehog.

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Cultivate has beautiful ceramics by Mollie Morris on display, and Laura Mae Noble’s terrariums are little vignettes you can get lost in.

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I had a snack at La Principal before heading to the Swarm opening.

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Got was in a swarmy mood throughout the day, and these pieces at Ausrine’s Art Room, The Collage Cafe and See Jane Sparkle were fun to get me into opening mood.

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Then it was time to see the swarm, and I’ll share pics of that lovely evening next week.

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Evanston Made kicks off June 3

June is promising to be a fun month. I will be exhibiting at the Evanston Art Center as part of Evanston Made. Formerly Open Studios Evanston, Evanston Made is a month-long celebration of the arts in Evanston designed to create opportunities for artists to engage with the community (and vice versa). Art studios, galleries, museums and businesses throughout Evanston will show works by Evanston creatives June 3 through 30, 2016.

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I am looking forward to attending the opening reception of the Evanston Made exhibit at the Evanston Art Center (1717 Central Street, Evanston, IL 60201). Numerous local artists have submitted art work and I look forward to mixing and mingling and being inspired by their work. The reception is from 5 to 8 pm on Friday, June 3. There will be shadow puppets too!

I walked the show last year and had a blast. The Evanston Made show will be up through June 30. Evanston Art Center Gallery hours are Monday – Thursday: 9 am – 9 pm, Friday: 9 am – 5 pm, Saturday and Sunday: 9 am – 4 pm and admission is free.

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In conjunction with the exhibit, Evanston Art Center is hosting a Pop Up Gallery and Store June 3-30. The store is located in the lobby of the Evanston Art Center and you can meet the various artists (listed below) during their pop-up shifts. Evanston Made’s artist studio tour is June 4, 12-5 p.m. Maps for the studio tour will be available online and at Evanston Art Center June 3 & 4.

Evanston Made Kids! — held on June 4 from 11am to 4 p.m. at Evanston Art Center — celebrates young Evanston artists and their families with a day of FREE fun and creativity in the parking lot of 1717 Central Street. Visitors will enjoy hands-on make-and-take arts activities, how-to workshops, an eclectic exhibition of Evanston-based artists, a pop-up store of handmade goods, live performances and picnic nook featuring the fares of various food trucks.

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Participating venues will show works by Evanston creatives June 3 – 30. In addition to the Music piece you’ll find at the Evanston Art Center, I am creating a swarm installation for SideTracked Studio. That opening takes place Saturday, June 4 from 6 to 9 p.m. (more on that in my next post). You can see my pieces and other artists works at Creative Coworking, 922 Davis street. Sara Jane Abbott of See Jane Sparkle is an official participant (where I am consigned), and I met The Collage Cafe’s Lindy Stockton during the first studio tour, who is featuring Angela Williams this month.

My caffeine source Brothers K Coffeehouse features an exciting collaboration for Evanston Made. Jason Brown, Rob Larson, and Travis Clement are collaborating to create site specific wall installations. In the spirit of Evanston Made, they are hoping to stretch their coffee-sipping neighbors to creatively re-imagine the everyday. Cultivate Urban Rain Forest features works by Laura Mae Noble, terrarium designer, Mollie Miller, ceramicist, and Paul Whittaker, abstract artist and photographer.

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Next to See Jane Sparkle Perspective Group and Photography Gallery will exhibit photographs by Bob Tanner and Faigie Tanner. Stumble & Relish features assorted locally made goods that will be discounted 15% throughout June.  Other venues include:

  • The Celtic Knot Public House showing works by James Deeb
  • Space 900 features works by Ken Avick, Colleen Conley, Clark Ellithorpe, Judith Roston Freilich, Joanna Pinsky and Peggie Robinson
  • The Pot Shop has works by Dominic Mosca
  • The Saw Room features works by Dana DeAno
  • Open Studio Project showcases works by Y.O.U. Youth Artists
  • Ausrine’s Arts Room shows works by Ausrine Kerr, Rita Shimelfarb, Yvette Meltzer
  • Bookends & Beginnings showing works by Stephen Murphy
  • Boltwood with works by Dana DeAno
  • The New Studio with Mel Winer and Karen Vierneisel
  • Chiropractic 1st showing works by Stephen Lloyd
  • Mill Creek Miniatures showing works by Judith Lewin, Amy O. Woodbury
  • Midwest Clay Guild featuring Patty Kochaver, Sarah Meyer, Susan Curry, Jon Weiss, Dana Shearin, Layna Portugal,Judy Disman, Jill Birschbach & Joanna Kramer
  • DragonFly Boutique showing local artists Vanessa Filley, Kristin Bruni and Karna Erickson
  • Ayla’s Originals, featuring beaded baubles
  • Five Finger Press hosts works by Patti Montgomery
  • Gather featuring works by Kristen Neveu
  • Trash & Treasures featuring works by Carol Hammerman
  • Alley Gallery showcases works by Ross Martens and Darren Oberto
  • La Petite Gallery Lapin showcases works by Katherine Orr
  • Prairie Joe’s features works by Aydin Dincer
  • Frame Warehouse will highlight Paul Nebenzahl

Other events include artist talks at EAC on June 5, 12, 19 and 26. Find out more and tag #EvanstonMade via http://twitter.com/EvanstonMade, https://www.facebook.com/Evanston-Made and instagram @Evanston_Made.

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Hosted by the Evanston Art Center and produced by Anomaly Productions, the Pop-Up Gallery and Store is an “all -inclusive” event and artists, with locally created wares in categories from ceramics to jewelry to housewares. Participating creatives include: Amy Amoroso, Amy Gabbert, Amy Harms, Andrea Koch, Angela Williams, Ayla Pizzo, Carol Beaver, Carol Hammerman, Chris Heisinger, David Sutton, Deborah Hirshfield, Dena Vincent, Donna Bartman Masini, Doug Haight, Fay Bomberg, Heather Hancock, Jane Grover, Jane Sisco, Jason Brown, Jason Cohn, Jill Birschbach, Joanna Kramer, Julie Rivera, Karen Daughtry, Kate Williamson, Kathryn Ware, Katie Sircher, Kevin Kipp, Kristin Mariani, Lena Kim, Leon Litinsky, Lisa Nicolson, Margarita Shimelfarb, Marla Wallerstein, Micah Hanson, Pat Bernard, Patty Kochaver, Paul Segedin, Rebecca Hill, Rob Larson, Roslyn Broder, Sara Piepmeier, Sarah Meyer, Sheryl Coaxum, Theresa Pawlan, Travis Clement, Vanessa Filey and Yvette Meltzer.

This annual studio tour changed its name to Evanston Made in 2016, to alleviate confusion with the non-profit organization Open Studio Project.
Promotional Graphics courtesy Evanston Made and SideTracked studio.

Open Studios Evanston this Saturday

June promises to be a busy and artful month. The artist community in Evanston has banded together to host Open Studios Evanston. In its second year, June 6 allows Evanston residents and visitors to poke around the studios of local artists, including those who do not generally open their studio to the public. This Saturday I will pop in at Creative Coworking. Several of the artists adorning the building’s walls will be present between 12 and 5 pm.

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From Central street to Oakton, painters, sculptors, filmmakers, jewelers, clothing designers, photographers, puppeteers, acrobats, singers, dancers, and other creatives are hosting open houses to let the curious wanderer explore Evanston’s art scene.

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I will mingle with the resident artists at 922 Davis Street arond noon before moving along the trail myself. Numerous arts organizations, galleries and boutiques are joining the celebration with special events. Maps and a list of participants are provided the day of the event at locations throughout the city.

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My friends at Sidetracked Studio are hosting a fundraiser raffle for the Trio Animal Foundation, and Hip Circle Studio will teach you how to choreograph a dance. Encaustic arts will also be represented at Gather and at Perspective Gallery. Dragonfly Boutique (hostess to my earrings and pendants) is having a 20% off moving sale through Sunday.

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So grab a map and meander around town on Saturday! Regardless of the neighborhood you’re in, you’re bound to find inspiration.

Maps designed by IDG Evanston and courtesy of Open Studios Evanston.