Halim’s Time Piece Collection

On my first visit to the Halim Museum I also strolled through the Clocks of the World. This exhibit starts with a reproduction of the oldest known clock, and impressive installation of gears attributed to Richard of Wallingford. He designed an astronomical clock,which was built approximately 20 years after his death.

More than 1,100 timepieces are on display in a labyrinth of hallways and rooms. The collection includes tower clocks, chronometers, automatons, pocket watches and tall case clocks.

There is a German domestic Turret clock from the 1500s. It is hard to imagine that time pieces were not a personal or household instrument during those times.

In England, clocks were designated for markets, such as this Turkish Market clock from 1780.

There is a room designated to nautical instruments that any sea-lover will want to spend time in.

It has a beautiful stained glass dome.

I learned of the Dutch and German influences of clock making, and took note of those detailed descriptions with my camera.

Galileo’s original pendulum mechanism was on display as a model.

Its application to the first pendulum clock is attributed to Dutchman Christiaan Huygens in 1656. Then the Fromanteels took their training in The Hague during the 1860s to England, and English clocks built upon the Dutch education.

I do love the ornate clocks such as this Catherine the Great Elephant Clock made by Meissen designer Peter Reinecke in the 1700s.

My Greek memories had me gravitating toward Hellenistic Goddess themes as well, like this Athena and Hermes Clock. This one is also a Meissen Design.

The Dutch reoccurred in the 1700s as well with Bernard I van Risamburgh designing some clocks as well. Of course no clock collection can ignore the Black Forest Clock Industry

Of course the mechanical clocks are super fun, and the ones presented have computer screens showing all the gears in motion.

The Watch collection is overwhelming, and there is a lot more to see in this fabulous gem of a museum. I will definitely revisit the museum at a future date to take in more of this exhibit, though I think it is impossible to do so in detail in one visit alone.

Stained Glass at the Halim Museum

In early January I took a staycation and stumbled on a wonderful new Evanston Museum. Founded by an avid collector of clockworks and stained glass windows, this brand-new museum is a gem!

The museum houses three exhibits: Stained Glass Masters, Treasures of Louis Comfort Tiffany, and Clocks of the World.


Custom-built by the Halim family, the building has 5 storeys, of which 2 hold the exhibits and the others rentable event space.

The outward rectangular shape belies the internal labyrinth of hallways custom-designed to house each collection item.

The museum, located at 1560 Oak Avenue in Evanston, opened September 26 and is $17 to visit. It is kid friendly, and visitors are encouraged to touch the stained glass.

The Stained Glass Masters exhibit houses more than 30 windows, and begins by explaining the European stained glass techniques on which American School of Stained Glass built.

Of course now I want to backtrack and see what my Dutch ancestors did, but that is a research project for another day.

I discovered numerous new glass artists in these halls, including artists like Frederick Wilson who made a name for themselves in Tiffany’s workshops, but also others that worked independently or as other companies.

The collection houses works by John La Farge, William T Hickinson, Mayer and Company, David and Helen Maitland Armstrong, Frederick Stymetz Lamb, Rudy Brothers Company, Edward Peck Sperry, J&R Lamb studios, and George Maher. Each display has a detailed narrative about the maker as well as the theme of the window.  It is a lot to take in during the first round.

There are beautiful displays of opalescent glass, along with other techniques that are highlighted in the exhibit’s narrative. Tours are also available.

I learned about confetti glass.

The exhibit offers a lot of background information on the industry and various glass techniques. I also flashed back to Susan Vreeland’s Clara and Mr. Tiffany, which is a great read for this exhibit.

I was struck by the work of Mary Tillinghast. Born in New York, she studied in Paris under Carolus-Duran and Henner.

She received a gold medal at the Chicago Exposition in 1893 and gold and bronze medals at the Charleston Exposition in 1902. I love details of her windows.

One source says that Mary was the first to understand how electric lighting would impact the effects of window design. Tillinghast became a textile designer, served as manager of the La Farge Decorative Art Company, and learned the art of designing and making windows from La Farge. There is no wikipedia page on her yet, but another blogger claims that she sued La Farge’s company and started her own company. I like this lady!

Treasures of Louis Comfort Tiffany traces the creative life of the artist.  It showcases his innovations in stained glass, pottery and other media. This exhibit includes paintings in oils, pastels and watercolors that showcase his early life and travels.

Later works include housewares and decorative arts, mosaics and windows.

Beautiful Mosaics with iridescent details are on display.

Here’s another old art form to immerse oneself with.

The chandeliers were mesmerizing also.

Even though the stained glass had saturated my brain, I couldn’t resist going upstairs to peruse the Clocks of the World. I’ll save that for another blog post though…

The Halim family certainly has an eye for beauty, and I love that they share their passion collection with the public. I highly recommend multiple visit to this lovely museum, and plan on making a few returns myself.

The skylights are striking too, and I learned more about other Chicago Landmarks through this exhibit.

This local beauty is a great addendum to the Stained Glass Museum at Navy Pier.

Elmhurst Art Museum

Last week I visited the Elmhurst Art Museum, which has two lovely exhibits up.

The cartoon-like works of the Forced Field exhibit by Hebru Brantley seem cheerful at first, but have an underlying message that is more serious. Hebru’s Flyboy is a recurrent theme, based on the Tuskegee Airmen from World War II.

The collection is a vibrant array of 2-d and 3-d art, and the power of repetition is clearly illustrated in both his painted and sculptural works. His Lil Mama character is also featured in the exhibit.

In the exhibit notes, the works showcased at the Museum also allude to the way communities keep each other in check, not wanting a person to break out of the mold. It is interesting to consider that we want our younger generations to excel, yet if they get too adventurous those around them will over-protect and try to reel them back in.

The title “Forced Field” is a reference to South Siders not letting anyone go past a certain point of their neighborhood out of fear and/or ignorance.

The titles add a sinister dimension to the vibrant paintings on display. Some were over my head, but others indicated the state of the nation very clearly.

Not being American I am learning a lot about the history of race relations, yet I suspect that many viewers will be introduced to new ideas through Hebru’s art.

There is a graffiti wall by Hebru in the museum where people can add art and take selfies as Flyboy. I like the accessibility of the art work, even with the subtle messaging behind it. Forced Fields is up through November 26, and is definitely worth a visit.

I also perused Wesley R. Baker’s American Images exhibit, which closes September 22. This striking art work also addresses various political subjects, with artist statements going in depth about the meaning of each piece. Wesley’s love of motorcycles is evident in one half of the room, and I enjoyed his depiction of the freedom he and fellow riders experience while taking road trips.

The painter also illustrates his awareness of historic and political events. One sculpture serves as a stark reminder of slavery’s shackles. 

I learned about Ira Hayes through another sculpture.

His native American themed paintings evoke both the beauty and the struggle of indigenous tribes in America.

I didn’t realize that the museum also owns the McCormick House. Built by Mies van der Rohe, the building is undergoing renovation to its original state after being relocated to the Elmhurst Museum site in 1992. The house was originally built in 1952 for Robert Hall McCormick, Jr. and his wife.

Mies designed the minimalist house as a prototype for a proposed group of smaller, affordable middle-class homes in nearby Melrose Park. Unfortunately,glass, steel and brick on a concrete slab design proved unpopular and the project did not take off. The house has a framework of peripheral columns and ceiling beams, which allowed for an open and adaptable interior with movable wall partitions, now configured as storage spaces.

There are also some large scale sculptures on the museum grounds to interact with. It was a lovely outing prior to the Girls Nite Out event.

Encaustic 2017 Show

On Friday I visited the Bridgeport Art Center for Encaustic 2017: Rebirth of an Ancient Medium. Several FUSEDChicago members were part of this exhibit, so I knew it would be a fun social gathering of members.

In addition, I am always inspired by the works of my friends, and I enjoyed perusing the various walls showcasing a variety of encaustic techniques.

This all-encaustic exhibition includes the work of FUSEDChicago members Dan Addington, Alicia Forestall-Boehm, Cat L Crotchett, Helen Dannelly, Shelley Gilchrist, Carol Hamilton, Jeff Hirst, Cindy Martin Lesperance, Ahavani Mullen, Sarah Rehmer, Michele Thrane, VA de Pintor Art Works and Kathleen Waterloo. Also included is Jane Michalski and Paul Rinaldi.

Watching the group photo come about was fun.

Alicia’s cubes cast beautiful shadows.

She used the hooks already on the ceiling which is kind of a work of art.

In other installations the public can walk through her art work.

The color palettes are as varied as the techniques and substrates.

Kathleen Waterloo documented her work.

Michele Thrane’s work spans wide.

So much inspiration on each wall.

A wide variety of scale and texture.

Shelter Me Sweet Nurse by Dan Addington is large and has exquisite detail.

It makes a statement on the wall.

Life Signs: Rewind, Power, Play by Cindy Lesperance are a great take on the changes in technology.

Her dot technique is mesmerizing.

I love the shadows cast by some of the sculptural pieces.

Artist Helen Dannelly offered a demonstration for those unfamiliar with encaustics.

It was fun to watch the reactions to the demonstration and see the audience return to the art work with fresh eyes.

I am looking forward to the 3D class she and Alicia are offering in October.

This show runs through September 8 and is worth seeing in person.

You can see more photos at the FUSEDChicago Facebook Page.

The Bridgeport Art Center is located at 1200 W. 35th Street in Chicago. Enter on the North Side off of Racine / 34th Place to park.

FUSEDChicago offers various events and has resources for workshops and additional encaustic exhibits.

I’m inspired to enter the studio again.

 

LEGOs at the MSI

Last week I finally got to see the fabulous Brick by Brick LEGO exhibit at the Museum of Science and Industry.

This exhibit showcases landmark buildings while also teaching about structural engineering and other scientific feats pertaining to construction and architecture. We even get an inside view of the Giza Pyramids.

Adam Reed Tucker is the architect behind all these amazing structures. Who knew one could turn LEGO-building into an artistic career?

The Golden Gate Bridge had to be completed onsite and is 60 feet long.

Each display has facts about the real building as well as the number of bricks and hours it took to construct the replicas. Who wants to go to Rome’s Colosseum now?

Children of all all ages can build their own LEGO structures, and interact with a few other exhibits.

The buildings range from historic to modern around the world, and even a structure in outer space that is actually built like LEGO components.

Adam Reed Tucker took the solar panel bricks from Harry Potter sets. He also designs the architecture kits you can buy in stores.

Of course the MSI had to be replicated.

So much detail in each structure!

Visitors are encouraged to use the force.

There is a wall where all types of LEGO bricks used for each display are highlighted.

Disney’s Cinderella Castle is so lovely.

Engineering, calculations, patience and lots of imagination!

I love all the land-and waterscapes as well.

It makes me want to visit the real-life structures too, though I may not want to ride the American Eagle Rollercoaster.

Smaller structures are highlighted throughout as well, though I am not sure who created those.

After all that, we wanted the Great Train Story to be all LEGOs too, but that would be too much to ask.

Prompted by Cinderella’s LEGO digs, I told my friend about Colleen Moore’s Fairy Castle, and was thrilled to introduce her to it for the first time.

The Castle sparkles after its recent renovation.

There is so much to see, and each time I marvel at Colleen Moore’s dedication to this project, and her desire to help children with this ambitious hobby.

I reread the book about this project, and love how all the artisans and celebrities involved were captivated by the project as well.

We clowned around in what I call the Circus Wing.

I learned more about some of my favorite elements.

My visit is not complete without chuckling at Jollyball, my favorite pinball machine in the whole wide world (as far as I know thus far).

The museum is such a great blend of playful learning along with instruction about history, the environment, inventions, nature, scientific phenomena, and life.

Brick By Brick remains at the Chicago Museum through September 4.

Everything is AWESOME at the Museum of Science and Industry, and all the other museums Chicagoland cultivates.

What’s your favorite exhibit?

Black History Education at the Cultural Center

Last week I commuted downtown and decided to stroll over to the Chicago Cultural Center.

First, Angel and I passed the Monument with Standing Beast by Jean Dubuffet.

I walked in on a prototype of the story chair from the Conrad Sulzer Regional Library, which apparently doubles as a table and turns into a throne as stories are told.

Then I decided to start my exhibit exploration upstairs, where Eugene Eda’s Doors for Malcolm X College are on display.

This exhibition features all 32 doors painted by Eugene Eda for the stairwells of the original, now demolished Malcolm X College. Painted in 1971 they are considered a landmark of the Black Arts movement in Chicago.

The doors are thematically distinguished in 4 categories, based on their original stairwell locations.

  • A: Egyptian Hieroglyphs
  • B: West African and Sankofa
  • C: Black Aesthetics, Black Family
  • D: Black Power and Survival

Eugene Eda started with ancient Egypt as the foundation of his works, and then narrates the history of African culture and heritage with the other door themes. I was fascinated by all the symbolism represented in stairwell B, and want to learn more about Adinkra symbols used in West African culture.

Fortitude, unity and community are themes for stairwell C, showing scenes representing the various areas of study at Malcolm X College (currently arts, general studies, science and applied science), along with depictions of family. In Stairwell D, according to Michelle R. Perkins, the doors are to remind those passing through to “rise above anything that imprisons the body and the mind.”

Part of the interior design of the walls in this room had the inscription “lūx et vēritās”, meaning light and truth, which was very appropriate for this particular exhibit. As a European, I have a cursory acquaintance with American History, and even my world history education was quite Euro-centric, so learning more about Black History, African(-American) culture, Indigenous culture and what is essentially ‘non-white world history’ requires awareness and alertness.

I am grateful there is much activism to have these stories told and celebrated. Attending art talks and exhibits about marginalization is uncomfortable, but makes me a better human being who can hopefully respond better to the impact oppression has had on any group than be clouded by my own perceptions.

The next exhibit was 50×50 Invitational / The Subject is Chicago: People, Places, Possibilities, with artists from various Chicago Wards represented to make statements on the current state of the world, ranging from a postcard exhibit in which people wrote an artist about their wishes to statements about the current political climate.

Then I wandered on to The Wall of Respect: Vestiges, Shards and the Legacy of Black Power, where Eugene Eda was mentioned again. The history of this particular wall spoke of the difference in opinion even among a group that society at large tends to homogenize, and was educational in so many ways.

The activism on making voices heard about cultures and groups that have been oppressed, suppressed and ignored is important, and while it takes effort to gain understanding, it is vital to deal with the discomfort of historic inaccuracy and work to rectify it.

I wandered through a corridor that landed me in the ramp, where Passage by SO-IL from New York City, U.S., featuring photography by Iwan Baan from Amsterdam, The Netherlands is an ongoing exhibit.

From that window I also got a good view of the Piranesi Circus (Atelier Bow-Wow in Tokyo, Japan) in the Atrium, which intrigued me on all levels of the cultural center. Both these architectural masterpieces were part of the inaugural Chicago Architecture Biennial, a global exhibition of contemporary architecture, showcasing the visionary ideas of 100 architects and designers from 30 countries.

It is certainly a playground for the imagination.

Of course the internal architecture of the Cultural Center is a feast for the eyes as well.

With its original intent as Chicago’s first central public library in 1879, the building was designed to impress with rare imported marbles, polished brass, fine hardwoods, and mosaics.

This building is home of the world’s largest stained glass Tiffany dome.

Healy & Millet designed the other glass dome.

The workmanship is mesmerizing. You can learn more about the Chicago Cultural Center exhibits on this link.

I also came upon lovely quilts like this one by Laverne Brackens.

These quilts are held in library collections and loaned out for display after their cleaning before being placed in their conservatorship’s collections again.

With so much history and creativity to ponder, I left the Cultural Center to make my way home.

Chicago is such a diverse and vibrant city, and I strive to be more alert to the expression of voices that may not reflect my experience or point of view, but require me to get through some cognitive dissonance to grow as a human being and be a more compassionate citizen of the world.

Exploring Crystal Lake

On Friday I was scheduled for an evening art fair at the Immanuel Lutheran School in Crystal Lake, a suburb I had never visited before. So prior to the 4:30 pm setup time I decided to take the afternoon to explore the town. An online search produced an intriguing map of a nice walkable cluster downtown, so I figured out where to park and set the coordinates for a leisurely drive.

The weather was lovely (albeit slightly chilly), and I parked my car in a 4-hour spot. Then I oriented myself based on the map by the train station.

Since it was lunchtime I checked the list of restaurants first, and picked two that looked intriguing. While passing a bunch of enticing windows I decided on Le Petit Marche, a lovely french-inspired bistro.

I ordered a tuna salad brioche with tea, which was served quickly.

The ambiance is lovely, and I would love take part in a wine and cheese evening sometime.

I was going to leave some postcards for Affair of the Arts, but someone already had. 🙂

Fully nourished, I walked to the end of the street and fell in love with the Crystal Lake Antique Mall. This place has rooms upon rooms of vintage pieces that inspire nostalgia and tempt those with a flair for spinning stories about old pieces. I saw a lovely wooden desk secretary at a bargain price, but instead settled on a tray I actually needed. I do think I’ll visit again though, maybe I will know a place to put that piece by then (if it is still there).

Fully uplifted by this historic surprise, I strolled back outside and made my way back into modern times in an old-town setting.

I meandered 2 fabric stores, some fashion boutiques, and then stumbled onto Kaleidoscoops via a gift shop, and couldn’t resist treating myself to a cone. This is a nice after-school hangout for teens. I needed caffeine for a long evening so “The Grind” was a perfect fix with its delicious caramel and the crunch of chocolate covered espresso beans inside.

Across from the ice cream store was Evolve, a store with yummy-smelling chakra candles, lots of healing crystals, altar pieces, incense and beautiful instruments to center the soul. I could have spent hours in there but had a schedule to keep.

So I strolled in and out of a few more cute stores before being stopped by the Metra. In the future I could catch the UP-NW metro line in Mount Prospect for a mini trip to Crystal Lake.

On my way to the car I spotted this fun sign that applies to so much of life.

Five minutes later I was at the Lutheran School to unload my car in the gym.

Soon the place was transformed into a vibrant and colorful fair.

Fancy meeting Le Petit Marche here again!

It was fun getting back into the booth setup routine.

I had fun doing a quick perusal.

 Tupperware is more vibrant these days.

Now that I am sewing again, this coat by Ginspiration spoke to me.

A raffle drawing was held every 30 minutes.

I gained some new admirers and a few pieces walked away.

My angels, dragonflies and ladybugs were all petted.

A friend stopped by and snapped me in action.

My neighbors were fun to connect with.

Soon it was time to pack up again and head home. It was a good evening and I look forward to visiting here again.

On to Affair of the Arts!

Main-Dempster Mile fun

I am easing out of hibernation and it is safe (no longer too cold) to take angel out and about on my adventures.

Evanston’s Main-Dempster mile is full of fun adventures. Squeezebox has the right idea with these postcards.

I had tacos for charity on the day of the Woman’s March, and later went to La Principal again with friends.

A few weeks later Brothers K collected funds for the ACLU.

My frosty is still hanging out at Rolf’s Auto Care, where I took my car for service.

We rewarded ourselves with some Sketchbook beer after a Hip Circle workout.

Stumble & Relish’s lovely card selection, along with my stash of Curly Girl Design’s Love Delivered subscription has me writing a postcard on Sundays.

I got to sample SPARK Syrup with Prosecco on Thursday and picked up some earrings I couldn’t resist.

Vivian Visser explained the process and inspiration behind her beautiful creations during an Artist talk at Cultivate.

This wonderful show is up through the end of the month.

It is always neat to see who shadows interact with art work on the wall.

I attended a few recent The Collage Cafe workshops, and loved the glowing woman who emerged from the last Grown*UP Girls Club session.

My vision boards will be shown when they manifest.

Then I was introduced to Bullet Journaling at Hip Circle Studio.

Next weekend I hope to explore Evanston’s Black-owned Businesses during Tour de Noir.

There’s always something fun to do in Evanston.

Elmhurst Day Out

Like last year, the Holiday Fair in Elmhurst was a blast. This year, I made a weekend trip out of it and started at the Lizzadro Museum of Lapidary Art.

lizzadromuseum

This museum houses the collection of Joseph Lizzadro, who enjoyed cutting and polishing jade as a hobby, and began collecting beautiful artifacts.

lizzadrovitrine

Because rough jade was not available, Joseph obtained many statues, that were sometimes re-purposed into jewelry he made.

statues

The entry-level floor is filled with beautiful statues and charming dioramas created entirely out of gemstones.

lapidarydioramas

The desert diorama was my favorite.

desertscene

The Castle Lizzadro is gorgeous, though its in memoriam footnote leaves a sense of sadness and mystery.

castlelizzadro

I learned about commesso in pietre dure, which is painting with slivers of stone. There are numerous explanations throughout the museum.

guanyinmercy

On the lower level, the displays delve into the mechanics of how stone is carved.

howtos

It also taught me about Hunsrück Slate and what types of stones form in which layer of sediment.

hunsruckfossils

I envy the opal collection.

opal

I also spotted a lovely butterfly.

petrifiedoakbutterflylizzadro

Soon I had absorbed all I could and it was time to head back out into the sunshine.

silhuette

Fall was at its glorious peak.

elmhursttrees

I had noted the You Are Beautiful signs at the Art Museum and decided to take a closer look.

elmhurstbeautifulmuseum

The sculptures were uplifting.

beautifulmessages

I still had a little bit of time left so I explored the Conservatory of Wilder Park, a lovely greenhouse.

wilderconsservatory

Wilder Park is truly beautiful.

wilderpark

Then it was time to unload the car and start setting up at the Wilder Mansion, which was basking in gorgeous sunlight.

wildermansion

I found my spot and then moved the car.

unloading

The three-tree setup took some planning.

settingup

Soon I had everything the way I wanted it.

boothsetup

I spun around to meet other vendors.

wildersetup

Laurie Messerol is so recognizable.

lauriemesserolbooth

Between 4 and 9 pm numerous visitor milled about.

day2crowds

Libations were flowing, and I got to sip on Prosecco.

prosecco

My frosties and angels were popular that day.

frostieselmhurst

Those who capitalized on the Cubs’ win sold out their blue, red and white wares.

corkcubbies

When the doors closed we wrapped our booths for their slumber party.

boothslumber

The fountain was lovely at night.

nightfountain

I took stock of my purchases.

carlabanksdesigns

The next day we opened from 10 am to 5 pm, and more visitors milled about.

shoppers

This new vendor has lovely whimsy for sewers and knitters.

paperorthreadsbooth

Again, angels and frosties were adopted, and I am thrilled Elmhurst Angel stayed in Elmhurst.

angelsinelmhurst

I think the trees help.

threetrees

Jewelry also found new owners.

elmhurstjewelry

This is a great show for vendors to get their start in, and I enjoyed the lovely work by made by Q.

madebyqcards

I also met a lovely new pint-sized admirer who ordered a custom bangle.

girlbangle

Dragonflies are fluttering in new homes too.

elmhusrtornaments

It was a lovely weekend, and we all enjoyed our time in a beautiful setting.

mirror

Then I packed up what remained to be divided among boutiques and upcoming shows.

boothdetails

Soon the mansion was cleared, and ready for its next event. RGL Marketing for the Arts will put on an outdoor Spring Show in May.

endholidayfair

I buckled up my ornaments and drove home.

buckledangels

Then I headed to Ayla’s to source beads for another custom bangle, which I will send off this week.

banglecommission

If you want to commission a piece, contact me now since the holiday crunch is real.

The Moseltalbahn and the Rheingaulinie

I lived in Germany for 7 years, and was thrilled when my aunt and uncle took me to revisit the lovely Rheingau.

eltvilleamrhein

We strolled by the river in Eltville and then visited a lovely garden at The Burg of Eltville, built in 1329.

eltvilleburg

Roses were still in bloom.

eltvillegarten

We passed a lovely wine press.

weinpress

I forgot how magnificent the churches are, and katholische Pfarrkirche St. Peter und Paul had a lovely blend of modern and old stained glass windows.

eltvillekirche

This Ölberggruppe aus der Werkstatt von Peter Schro is fascinating.

gethsemane

Fachwerk is everywhere

fachwerk

We had a snack and some Riesling at the Brentanohaus, where Goethe was a regular.

allendorfbrentano

Sage advice from the wine growers:

savewaterdrinkriesling

Beautiful grapes.

weinreben

We dined at Kloster Eberbach, known in Hollywood as the movie setting of the Name of the Rose.

klostereberbach

It was a lovely reintegration into Germany.

eberbachkerzen

I rode the train to Stuttgart when it was dark, so I have not much to share from that ride.

koblenz-wiesbadenzug

The ICE is lovely to ride though.

wiesbaden-stuttgart

After Stuttgart and a visit to Luxembourg I got back on the train in Trier, which are future blog posts.

trier-koblenzroute

From Trier’s Hauptbahnhof, I passed the St. Paulin Kirche.

trierkirche

Then I was treated to a lovely Mosel valley ride via the Moseltalbahn route.

moselrivier

Wineries abound along the hillsides.

moselwinery

Fall was making its entrance.

trier-koblenzreise

Castles dot the landscape along wineries.

weinrebenburg

The towns along the river are so beautiful.

moselufer

Mountains and Water are a lovely combination.

schoenemosel

In Koblenz I switched over to the Rheingaulinie.

koblenz-wiesbadenroute

I only caught a glimpse of Koblenz’s fort.

koblenzstop

This line travels along the Rhein valley.

rheingaulinie

The windows were a bit dirty, so getting good shots was harder, especially after sunset.

dirtywindowdb

Oberlahnstein had an intriguing tower by its station.

obrelahnstein

The towns are so picturesque.

moselberge

Churches abound.

moselreise1

The sunset was gorgeous.

rheinreise

My camera did me proud.

dbsunset

I passed another castle ruin along the way.

rheingaukirche

Scope for the imagination.

rheincastle

In Kaub there is this Burg, which reminds me of the many Rhein tales. There is a song about two lovers who couldn’t swim to each other and this castle feels like the setting for it.

kaubburg

Soon I arrived in Wiesbaden, in the dark.

lumixwindow

Wiesbaden is home to the largest Cuckoo Clock in the world.

largestcuckooclock

It was filled with cuckoo clocks, of course, and wooden Christmas decor.

cuckoo

My aunt and uncle live near the Neroberg Kapelle.

neroberg

We listened to the noontime music of the Marktkirche.

marktkirche

More travel pictures will follow, as this was a fun sightseeing trip.

pretripreview